Very Veryyy Early Interesting MLB Hitting Statistics Dump (Team Edition)

The Atlanta Braves have hit the most home runs in the MLB with 38.  Justin Upton, OF, has hit 12 of the 38 home runs.  The Braves as a team have a .324/.428/.752 (OBP/SLUG/OPS) line on the season.  When you take Justin Upton out of the equation, the Braves line drops down to .312/.395/.707.

The Oakland Athletics have scored the most runs in the MLB, scoring 158.  They only scored 88 in their equivalent first 28 games in 2012.  That averages out to 2.5 runs scored per game in their first 28 games of 2012 and 5.6 runs per game in 2013.  The Athletics on-base percentage has also jumped up from .281 to .345; over the same spans.

Houston Astros batters have struck out 267 times, the most in the majors.  According to Baseball-Almanac the 2010 Arizona Diamondbacks currently own the record for most times striking out in a season with 1,529.  The Astros are currently on a pace, that has them striking out 1,602 times over 162 games to break that record.  The Braves, who have struck out the second most amount of times so far in 2013, are also on pace to break that record as well.  They are on pace to strike out 1,532 times over 162 games.

The Astros have also grounded into the least amount of doubles plays, 10, so far in 2013.  The Seattle Mariners have grounded into the most, hitting into 32 double plays.  The Mariners lack of speed has also played a key role in the fact that they have stolen the least amount of bases, 7, so far in 2013.  The high powered Athletics offense has stolen the most bases stealing, 25, so far.

The Cleavland Indians have led the league with a .200 ISO.  The Marlins are the worst with a .083 ISO.

The Boston Red Sox have a .339 BABIP to lead the MLB so far in 2013.  The Blue Jays and Cubs are tied for the worst, each with a .264 BABIP.

The St. Louis Cardinals have seen the highest percentage of fastballs, 62 percent, of the pitches they have seen.  The Los Angeles Angels are on the other side of the spectrum at 54.8 percent.  But when the Angels have seen a fastball so far in 2013, they are seeing the fastest average fastball, 91.8  mph.  The Rockies have seen the slowest average fastball, averaging 90.1 mph.

The Angels *cough Josh Hamilton cough* have swung at the highest percentage of pitches seen so far in 2013, at 48.5 percent.  The Indians have swung at only 42.1 percent of the pitches they have seen, the lowest rate in the MLB.  The San Francisco Giants have the highest contact rate in the majors at 82.3 percent.

The Milwaukee Brewers have seen the highest percentage of first pitch strikes, 63.5 percent.  The Athletics have seen the fewest percentage of first pitch strikes as a team at 55.5 percent.

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Source:  Fangraphs & Baseball-Reference.  Stats as of Wed. May 1, 2013 4:17 AM ET

Very Veryyy Early Interesting MLB Hitting Statistics Dump

Two Tigers outfielders, Tori Hunter and Austin Jackson lead the MLB with 24 hits each.

Braves OF, Justin Upton leads the MLB with 8 home runs. He didn’t hit his first home run of the season in 2012, until April 23.  It took him 365 plate appearances and until July 20, to hit his eighth home run in 2012.  He currently sits at 57 PA for the 2013 season.

Mets catcher, John Buck is doing his best to try to keep prospect Travis d’Arnaud in the minors.  Buck is tied for MLB lead with 19 runs batted in.  He had 18 RBI last season through June 26.  So in terms of batting runners home he is about 41 games ahead of his 2012 pace in Miami.  Buck also already has 6 home runs, a plateau he did not reach until June 24 last season.

Reds 1B, Joey Votto has walked in 1/3 of his 63 plate appearances in 2013.  Votto did not qualify for the batting title in 2012 due to injuries, but among players with at least 450 PA in 2012 Joey Votto led the MLB with a 19.3 percent walk rate.

Starlin Castro has had 58 plate appearances in 2013 and walked ZERO times.

Braves 3B, Chris Johnson leads the MLB with a .500 BABIP (Batting Average on Balls in Play).  Braves OF, Jason Heyward has the second worst BABIP among qualified players sitting at .091.

Two players in the MLB currently have a .500 On-base percentage, or better.  They are Joey Voto with a .556 OBP and Lance Berkman with a .500 OBP.

The best fielder in the MLB thus far has been Matt Dominguez according to the fielding leaderboard on Fangraphs.  For what it’s worth, I will say that defensive sabermetrics are something I do not completely buy into.  However it is hard to argue against the fact that the same leader board rates Ryan Zimmerman and Shin-Soo Choo as the worst two fielders in the majors thus far in 2013.

Speaking of Reds outfielder Shin-Soo Choo, he has been hit by seven pitches already in 2013.  No team, other than Choo’s team the Reds, has been hit more than seven times as a whole.

Royals 2B Chris Getz, has seen the highest percentage of pitches being fastballs, 76.1 percent, in the MLB.  Pirates 3B Pedro Alvarez, has seen the lowest percentage of pitches being fastballs, 39.9 percent, in the MLB.

Reds 1B Joey Votto, has swung the bat on pitches outside of the zone 13 percent of the time, the lowest rate in the MLB.  Giants 3B Pablo Sandoval, has swung at 46.9 percent of pitches outside the zone, the highest rate in the MLB.  Overall Sandoval is swinging the bat at 60.6 percent of the pitches he has seen, also the highest rate in the MLB.  Mets OF Lucas Duda, beats Voto here, in terms of swinging at the least percentage of pitches seen – 29.9 percent.

Braves shortstop Andrelton Simmons and Brewers OF Carlos Gomez each have been in a 0-1 count at the highest rate in the MLB, each seeing a first pitch strike 76.1 percent of the time.

Pirates 3B Pedro Alvarez has a 19.7 percent swinging strike percentage to lead the MLB.  And maybe the statistic that sticks out to me most in this whole post is the fact that in 51 plate appearances in 2013 Marlins 3B, Placido Polanco, has a swinging strike percentage of 0.0 percent, according to Fangraphs.  This is just phenomenal bat control, and even though it really sticks out to me I am going to trust Fangraphs is right, like usual.  I mean that is just crazy to think about, he has seen 176 pitches in 2013 against some of the best pitchers on the planet and he has not swung and missed at any of those pitches.

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Source:  Fangraphs and Baseball-Reference. Stats through April 17, 2013 games.

From ICOM 101: Survival of the Fittest (State of the Industry Blog)

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Photo From NYDailyNews.com
Change, change, and change some more!  Journalists and news corporations in today’s world need the ability to adapt and predict how you might need  to adapt in the future.According to Pew Research Center’s State of the News Media Annual Report 2011newsrooms are 30 percent smaller than they were in the year 2000.As the United States has made the transition to the Information Age, technology has brought problems to the news industry that they had in large part never anticipated.  Starting in the 1990s new emerging technology was being invented,  where much of anything can be easily accessed with a few clicks of a mouse.

News outlets biggest problem is not that they are creating worse content.  It is rather finding away to make money off the content they create.  Google News and other sources make it easily accessible to get news, and more importantly for FREE! That is hard to compete against.  Also what happens when you lose revenue in terms of paid subscriptions and paid product?

Advertisers do not want to advertise their product in a place they find that people will not see.  Therefore this free access to news is a double-edged sword.


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As you can see by looking at the graphs above, the future for print journalism does not look that bright.  Their primary age group of readership won’t be around for all too many years.But there is good news.  With a willingness to embrace the changing revenue model you can still make it in the news business.  It is just a different newsroom than it was ten and more years ago.I think personally web based media is and can be used as an extension to print journalism.  I mean, it still is type right?  It is just on a screen instead of on paper.  Plus with it being on a computer you can make things more visually appealing to the eyes of people.  You can put interactive graphs like this one on the New York Times where people can show where they all were on September 11, 2001 and their reactions to it.  They also have hurricane trackers like this one for Hurricane Katia.  This is all still print journalism in its roots to me, just with more perks.

The problem is and has been “How can we continue making a profit doing this?”  This has led to the dwindling down of news staffs and putting more work on each individual reporter.

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Personally I believe this all to be just a big shift to digital journalism.  Television and radio have been hit by online journalism, but nothing near that of print journalism.  But I believe where there is a will there is a way.  If you are a good writer you can get a job doing news in some fashion.  If you are good enough you might get on and be paid as an ESPN.com blogger or some people make a decent living being their own journalists marketing themselves rather than a company.

Wherever the winds blow news, it will still be here.  It just is in the process of finding a new revenue system so that it can suffice itself.  That will help contribute to less middle news outlets in my opinion and more smaller individualistic brands with of course still the brand names being around like The New York Times, ESPN, and the Wall Street Journal.

I personally am heading into this with a sense of eagerness rather than scared.  It is an exciting time to be a journalist in my opinion.  My generation and I will go down in the history of journalism as the ones who found a way to bring it back to prospering.  That sounds exciting to me.

Click Here if you want to see more from The State of News Media 2011 by Pew Research Center!